1840 - 1850

History

Rama II

King Buddha

Loetlad Nabhalai

1181 - 1218
Example Stone Inscription
(Not related to cats)

Khmer Script and Language

Author Unknown

Samut Thai - Tamra Maew
Khmer Script
Second Abbot of
Wat Bawonniwet

Samut Thai - Tamra Maew

Old Thai language

Various Monks in Bangkok 

         Thailand's history has been documented in ancient stone inscriptions and more recently written on paper made from the khoi tree (Streblus asper). These folding books are referred to as Samut Khoi, or Samut Thai. While many of these books were burned in the Ayutthaya war with the Burmese (1765 - 1767), some survived and were moved to the new capital in Bangkok and copied at various temples. Others are believed to be translated from the stone inscriptions which survived the fire. The fourth king of Thailand, Rama IV (ruling 1851 - 1868) is well known for his knowledge of Khmer and Pali script / language and is responsible for translating many of these stone carvings into Thai language which were recorded in Samut Thai folding books. Thousands of these books exist, many of which are preserved in the National Library of Thailand. One such book describes good luck and bad luck cats. These books are referred to as the Tamra Maew (or cat poems).

Phra Khru

Wiboon Yanakij

18xx - 1xxx

1927 - 2016

1925 - 1946

Mod Bunnag

Queen

Savang Vadhana

Rama V

King Chulalongkorn

Princess

Piyamavadi

Queen

Debsirindra

1804 - 1868

Royal Family and Maew Boran
1957
Maew Boran Manuscripts - Historic Timeline
ca 1800 - early 1900s

Current King

1951 - Present

18xx

Princess

Chulabhorn

1955 - Present

1957 - Present

1952 - Present

Tamra Maew Mural

Old Thai language

Wat Pho Library 

Rama X

King Vajiralongkorn

1737 - 1809

1737 - 1826

1787 - 1851

Queen Sirikit

1932 - Present

Princess

Roengchitcharang Apakorn

Kim Apakorn

Na Ayutthaya

Princess

Srinagarindra

1900 - 1995

1922 - 2014

Rama VIII

King Ananda Mahidol

Rama IX

King Bhumibol

1862 - 1955

1862 - 1932

1853 - 1910

1838 - 1904

1834 - 1862

Rama IV

King Mongkut

The International Maew Boran Association

Princess

Ubol Ratana

Princess

Sirindhorn

Tamra Maew Boran

Modern Thai language

In Honor of Phra Khru Wiboon Yanakij

Tamra Duu Laksara Maew

Modern Thai language

Somdet Phra Puttajan

2014

Princess

Sri Sulalai

1767 - 1836

1767 - 1824

Somdet Phra Maha Samana Chao Krom Phraya Pavares Variyalongkorn

1809 - 1892

1905 - 1993

1923 - 2008

1892 - 1929

Prince

Abhakara Kiartivongse

1880 - 1923

Somdet Phra Puttajan Phutthasaramaha Tdaera

1864 - 1956

Rama I

King Buddha

Yodfa Chulaloke

Somdet Phra Maha Samana Chao Kromma Phra Paramanujit Jinorasa Srisugatakhatiyavamsha

( Son of King Rama I )

1790 - 1853

Rama III

King Nangklao

1770 - 1837

Queen

Sri Suriyendra

Monks

Princess

Galyani Vadhana

Prince

Mahidol Adulyadej

Queen

Amarindra

       There are currently 15 different Tamra Maew manuscripts preserved in the National Library of Thailand. Martin Clutterbuck has studied these manuscripts in great detail and has published an in-depth analyses of these poems in his book "Siamese Cats : Legends and Reality". Despite popular belief that these manuscripts are from the Ayutthaya Period (1351 - 1767) we have found no evidence dating the manuscripts prior to the early 1800s. However, a newly discovered manuscript provides some evidence that these poems (not the manuscripts themselves) may date back to the 12th century during the Khmer (Cambodian) empire.


        Two new manuscripts have been discovered in 2014 which are in the possession of Wat Bowonniwet Vihara. Wat Bowon is not your typical temple, it is a royal Buddhist temple. Prince Mongkut arrived at Wat Bowon in 1836 where he was ordained and become the abbot for 14 years. In 1851 he ascended the throne and became better known as Rama IV, the fourth king of Thailand. All subsequent kings of Thailand were ordained at Wat Bowon, making it truly a royal temple. The newly discovered manuscripts were written by the second abbot of Wat Bowon, Somdet Phra Maha Samana Chao Krom Phraya Pavares Variyalongkorn who studied closely with Prince Mongkut. One of these manuscripts is in Khmer script, suggesting it may have originated from an ancient Khmer stone inscription. We are currently looking into possible connections with the Khmer Empire.